Is the Bible the Word of God?

It would not be an overstatement to say that God’s revealed word has been a source of controversy from nearly the beginning of time. The serpent of old asked Eve, “Did God actually say…” (Gen. 3:1), and that question has been an incessant refrain ever since. One of the central topics of the conversation, especially during the last 150 years, is inspiration. What do we mean when we say that God inspired the Bible? How has God inspired the texts we understand to have been written by various authors over the course of about 1,500 years? There are many more questions that arise in this kind of conversation, but it is helpful to begin by asking, “Is the Bible the Word of God?” Of course even this question will require some explanation, but here is a constructive starting point. Basil Manly has written a fantastic work on exactly this topic, and I found it to be extremely productive. Surprisingly, it was also food for my soul.

Read more...

Why do we have a “Membership Process?”

Why do we have a “Membership Process?”

The topic of Church Membership has garnered great interest in recent years, and a discussion of the meaning and value of Church Membership can be a rewarding in the context of any local church. Biblical investigation, historical study, and personal introspection are all in order when addressing Church Membership.

We are able to look to the Scriptures, as well as church history, for our understanding of every aspect of the Christian faith and the practice thereof. When church history agrees with Scripture, we may gain insight from the application of biblical truth in a context that is not our own. When church history diverges from the teaching of the Bible, we are better equipped to learn how we may avoid the trap ourselves and learn from the mistakes of others.

Because First Baptist Church of Diana is a biblically faithful church, the Bible authoritatively instructs us, and we must implement our understanding of the Scriptures accordingly. This means that we are also free from pragmatic or humanistic governing. No tradition, strong feelings, or prideful impulse may cause us to abdicate our responsibility before God.

In fact, it is our great joy and heavy burden to be faithful to God in leadership over the sheep God has placed under our care. This is a task that we all are inadequate to accomplish apart from the work of God in and through us.

Read more…


Read more...

The Synoptic Problem

The so-called Synoptic Problem does not seem to be a problem at all, in the useful sense of the word.  It seems to me that a better title for this issue would be the Synoptic Production or the Synoptic Compilation.  Yet, the Synoptic Problem it remains, and Clements describes the matter by saying, “Even a quick reading of the four Gospels reveals that three of them (Matthew, Mark, and Luke) are alike, especially when contrasted with John.“ He goes on to say that these similar three are called “synoptic” for the very reason that they share a common view of the life, ministry, sayings, works, death and resurrection of Christ.  “A more detailed comparison, however,” says Clements, “reveals a wide variety of differences as well as similarities… From a literary point of view, these facts raise difficult questions. How did the Gospels originate? Did their authors use each other’s work, and did they have other materials available to them?”[1]
 

Read more...

CHURCH – The Only Sanctifying Community

If the doctrine of justification is the Article upon which the Church stands or falls, then sanctification may be the doctrine which either provides her clothes or leaves her standing there naked. The Church of Jesus Christ is His bride, adorned with His own righteousness and set apart for His intimate affection and care. This truth is the comfort of all who understand themselves to be included among the household of God. Yet, Christ does not merely call the prostituting adulterous bride to wear new labels (justified and sanctified), He also calls her to live accordingly (Eph 4:1; 1 Thess 2:12). Living in light of her new status, the Church of Jesus Christ is declared to be holy and Christ is making her holy by the washing of His word “so that He might present the church to Himself in splendor” (Eph 5:25-27). This loving reconciliation and renewal is challenged by the fact that the visible Church is made up of believers who are still desirous towards sin, and therein lies the difficulty of understanding just how the visible Church may be clothed with righteousness as she stands justified before the watching world. However, a visible Church, full of sanctified believers, arrayed in magnificence and clothed in righteousness for all the world to see is exactly what God has intended the Church do be.

Read more…


Read more...

What is a church?

Some might think this is a silly question.  “Of course,” they might say, “everyone knows what a church is…”  If you Google this question you will read that a church is “a building used for public Christian worship.”  In a sense, it is true that a “church” can be considered a building, but it is certainly more than just a building. Read more…

Read more...